Arashi Shibori

Posted by Elizabeth Barton on 31 July 2015 | 0 Comments

Tags:

Here is an excerpt from Elizabeth Barton's class "Dyeing to Design", just one small part from one lesson in this fabulous 5-lesson online workshop which is starting soon. You won't want to miss it as it has a wealth of information....

We are going to make some Arashi shibori cloth. In traditional Arashi shibori, the fabric is wrapped around a long pole. It is then bound tightly by wrapping a cord all the way along the pole at narrow intervals, then the fabric is pulled down to one end so the cords are practically touching each other. Then the pole is immersed into a dye bath or painted with dye. This resist leads to diagonal stripes a bit like rain slashing down in a severe rain storm. Hence the word "Arashi" which means storm.

There are a number of books you can read about shibori; I would recommend Shibori: the inventive art of Japanese shaped resist dyeing by Yoshiko Wada, Mary Kellogg Rice and Jane Barton. pub Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1983.

Here is an excellent site with lots of examples http://www.wafuku.co.uk/kimonoinfo9.htm

We are going to try out one very quick way of getting an approximation of the beautiful wavy forms and stripes these methods can achieve in Dyeing To Design.

Elizabeth Barton

April Rains by Elizabeth Barton showing example of Arashi shibori dyeing

April Rains

Rainy Rainy Night by Elizabeth Barton showing example of Arashi shibori dyeing

Rainy Rainy Night


About Dyeing To Design: This is an online workshop at the Academy of Quilting. Creating your own fabrics is an enticing prospect, but they can be hard to use. Let Elizabeth help you solve that mystery. Each lesson is divided into two sections: dyeing and designing. You will learn to think about what the fabric wants and design your quilt to use your dyed fabrics to their best advantage. Elizabeth will show you her method for dyeing values, gradated colors and Arashi shibori. She will then teach you to thicken your dye and use it for silk screening and other painterly applications. If you already have a closet full of hand dyed fabrics, you can skip right to the design and construction of your quilts. Find out more...

Post your comment

Comments

No one has commented on this page yet.

RSS feed for comments on this page | RSS feed for all comments