My January Stitch Along week 4

Posted by Ruth on 25 January 2015 | 1 Comments


How did you get on finishing off your challenge piece? I worked on mine today and actually came up with a different way to bind off so that added to the fun. More fun came when the gallery pieces arrived in my inbox, which by the way, has now been updated.

So the first thing I had to do is sew up the mistake I made last week. It was no big deal and I actually almost pieced it to look as if there wasn't a mistake at all. I then started foundation piecing the pieces together.

stitchalong jan w4a

First three pieced in place

The shapes went on real easy with plenty of room to spare and before I knew it, I'd pieced the first half together.

stitchalong jan w4b

first half completed

I used the large triangles to flip and stitch on the second half.

stitchalong jan w4c

block completed

Now when I look at it, I feel like it is spinning and we are getting sucked into a whirlpool. 

Since the block was only going to end up 8" square, I decided to add some borders. I chose a red and black print. I cut the strips 2 1/2" wide and attached them to the sides...

stitchalong jan w4d

first sides attached

....then top and bottom.

stitchalong jan w4e

all borders added

I realized about now that these borders were just too wide so I figured instead of cutting them down, I'd use the excess to bind it, in a different kind of way.

First I layered the block and quilted through the center diagonal. I didn't feel like doing too much quilting, after all, I'd just finished another quilting project and I was anxious to see if my new-theory binding would work. What I did do was use a decorative stitch to quilt around the inside of the border.

stitchalong jan w4f

decorative stitch added as quilting

Then I folded back the border section and trimmed the batting and backing fabric to 1" wide. I did this on all sides.

stitchalong jan w4g

trimmed away batting and backing

Here's how it looks on the back now.

stitchalong jan w4h

the back

Over on the front, I chalked in a line along the edge of the batting as a guide where to stitch. I'm not sure if you can see it, so I pointed it out with a green arrow.

stitchalong jan w4i

chalked guide line

Next I used the same stitch, a decorative blanket stitch, to stitch around the edge using the line as a guide to keep it straight. As I stitched I realized how important it was to keep the border fabric taut and straight. I actually used some pins to hold it in line.

stitchalong jan w4j

second round of blanket stitch

When I finished, I flipped it over to the back and noticed I was right on the raw edges. Perfect. I could, if I had wanted to, just trimmed off the excess border fabric and leave it at that, but I really wanted to try this binding theory I had in mind.

stitchalong jan w4k

the back

So here goes with the binding and I was happy to say, it worked like a charm.

First I trimmed off the corners, not all the way close to the stitching, but halfway between the outer point and corner stitch.

stitchalong jan w4l

corners are trimmed

Then I folded the two sides in so they were doubled - raw edge meeting the stitches.

stitchalong jan w4m

raw edges folded in

Next I folded over the corner so the fold was right at the end of the stitching.

stitchalong jan w4n

corner folded in

I discovered this fold needed to be accurate. It needs to be square so when you fold the sides in, it makes a perfect miter.

stitchalong jan w4o

mitered corner

I pinned in all the corners and edges ready to hand stitch. 

stitchalong jan w4p

binding pinned in place

Now, if I'd thought sooner. I could have done this in reverse and used the backing fabric in the same way to make the binding on the front. There's something to try next time!

The finished piece is in the gallery with the other pieces, all are quite different!


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  • I must try this. Thanks.

    Posted by Jan, 26/01/2015 8:46am (3 years ago)

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